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Miniature RAR Chair

By Vitra

£125.00

  • Description

    Each Vitra miniature is true to the original in construction and materials, and reduced in size on a scale of 1:6. Each miniature is packaged in a wooden box, accompanied by an informational booklet. Production notes: Each of the delicate objects are made by hand; on average, each miniature requires five hours of careful manual work. Ongoing quality control ensures that every miniature corresponds to its larger original in terms of finishing, details and materials.

    The Fiberglass Chairs are rare examples of a satisfying synthesis of formal and technical innovation. For the first time in the history of design, Charles and Ray Eames utilized the unlimited malleability of plastic for the development of a comfortable seating shell that corresponds to the shape of the human body. The idea of making a three-dimensional molded shell goes back to a design from 1940. The original attempt to make the shell out of plywood was unsuccessful, however, due to the extreme conditions necessary to mold the material. Only with the advent of fiberglass technology was it possible to achieve satisfying results. The first Fiberglass Chair went into production in 1950.
    After years of experimentation, Charles and Ray Eames were able to realize their goal: an industrially produced chair that is inexpensive, sturdy, and comfortable. The Fiberglass Chairs come in several versions: with an A-shaped shell (armchair) or S-shaped shell (side chair) and on different bases, one of which is the famous »Eiffel Tower« base. Until 1968, Herman Miller also produced a rocking chair base. Every Herman Miller employee who expected a baby received it as a gift until 1984.

  • Technical Info

    H11.2 x W11.5 x D10.5 mm

    Plastic shell, steel wire »Eiffel Tower« base.

  • Designer
    Grete Jalk

    Grete Jalk was born in 1920. After completing her school leaving examination, she enrolled at Copenhagen University to study philosophy and law, but after completing the philosophy element she dropped out of university and instead took a year's instruction in design at the Drawing and Applied Art School for Women.
    In 1941, she served a three year apprenticeship with cabinetmaker Karen Margrethe Conradsen. In the final year of her apprenticeship she started at the College of Arts and Crafts Furniture School, graduating in 1946.
    Subsequently, Grete Jalk studied at the Academy of Fine Art's Furniture School under Kaare Klint and from 1950 until 1960 she taught at the College of Arts and Crafts Furniture School herself. In 1954 she got her own studio and in 1963 won a British furniture competition - the Daily Mail International Furniture competition with her moulded plywood chair - the GJ Chair.
    That same year, the chair was bought by the Museum of Modern Art in New York where it has remained on permanent exhibition. Grete Jalk died in 2006, aged 86.

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  • Delivery

    4-6 weeks

£125.00
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